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Price Comparison Chart

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The Dura Patcher is the most cost effective method of road repair by using less expensive materials and reducing labor cost per ton of patching. In addition, using this method adds to laborers' safety by greatly reducing their exposure to oncoming traffic. We simply get the job done faster using superior performance materials.

The multi-million dollar Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP) has acknowledged that our spray-injection method has the longest lasting patches of all other methods they have researched.

The following example shows the typical costs of road repair projects in most areas of the United States. Costs may vary somewhat in your area, so please fill in the examples below with your figures to see how much you will save using the Dura Patcher.


Hot or Cold Mix Patching Method
Project requiring 10 tons of material
Daily output: 5 tons

Patching cost per 8-hour day


1 Dump truck @ $30/hour x 2 days

$480.00

3 Men @ $10/hour x 2 days

$480.00

10 Tons of hot mix or cold mix @ $55/ton

$550.00

Total

$1510.00

Cost per ton ($1510 / 10 tons): $151.00 per ton

* Failure rate of 50% not figured in the above example.

The Dura Patcher Method



Project requiring 10 tons of material
Daily output: 10 tons

Patching cost per 8-hour day


1 Dump truck @ $30/hour

$240.00

2 Men @ $10/hour

$160.00

1 Dura Patcher @ $80/day

$80.00

12 Tons of rock @ $8.00/ton

$96.00

1 Ton of CRS2 Emulsion
(220 gallons @ $1.40/gallon)

$308.00

Total

$884.00

Cost per ton ($884.00 / 13 tons): $68.00 per ton

 

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Strategic Highway Research Program

 

In 1987, the U.S. Congress authorized the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP) a five-year, applied research initiative to develop and evaluate techniques and technologies to combat the deteriorating conditions of the nation's highways and to improve their performance, durability, safety, and efficiency.

Directed by a committee of top-level managers from state highway agencies, industry, and academia, SHRP operated as a unit of the National Research Council. The states paid for the program by contributing one-quarter of 1 percent of their federal-aid highway funds.